GENEALOGY EXPRESS

 

Welcome to
Black
History & Genealogy


...
 
Rise and Fall
of
Black Power
In America

Vol. I - II - III
Publ. Boston & New York
Houghton, Mifflin and Company
1873

TABLE OF CONTENTS - VOL.I

PREFACE  
CHAPTER I - THE BEGINNINGS AND GROWTH OF SLAVERY AND THE EARLY DEVELOPMENT OF THE SLAVE POWER 1-17
   - Basis of Slavery
 - American Slavery
 - Slave Power
 - Issues of the Civil War.
 - African Slave-trace
 - Slaves brought into Virginia
 - Colonial and Commercial Policy of England
 - Slave-trade encouraged
 - Colonial Statutes annulled
 - Spread of Slavery and Increase of Slave-trade
 - Slavery in New England
 - John Eliot
 - Samuel Sewell
 - Action of the Quakers
 - Testimonies against Slavery by Burling, Sandiford, Lay, Woolman, Benezet, Wesley, Whitefield.
 - Emancipation advocated by Dr. Hopkins and Dr. Rush.
 - Opinions of the Revolutionary Leaders
 - Slave-trade denounced by Congress
 - South Carolina and Georgia for the Slave-trade.
 - Articles of Confederation
 - Development of the Slave Power
 
CHAPTER II. - ABOLITION - ABOLITION SOCIETIES 18-30
   - Articles of Association of the Colonies
 - Colored Soldiers
 - Slavery abolished in Massachusetts and Pennsylvania
 - The Pennsylvania Abolition Society
 - New York Abolition Society
 - Rhode Island Abolition Society
 - The Abolition Societies of Connecticut, New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia.
 - Character of the Members of the Abolition Societies
 - National Conventions
 
CHAPTER III. - SLAVERY IN THE TERRITORIES - ORDINANCE OF 1787. 31-38
   - Public Domain
 - Cessions of Territory by the States
 - Mr. Jefferson's proposed Inhibition of Slavery in the Territories
 - Ordinance of 1787, reported by Nathan Dane
 - Adopted by Congress
 - Sanctioned by First Congress under the Constitution
 - Efforts to suspend it in Indiana
 - Blessings of the Ordinance of 1787
 - Cessions of North Carolina and Georgia, with  Limitations concerning Slavery.
 - The Mississippi Territory
 - Debate on Mr. Thatcher's Antislavery Amendment.
 
CHAPTER IV. - COMPROMISES OF THE CONSTITUTION - SLAVE REPRESENTATION - SLAVE-TRADE - RENDITION OF FUGITIVE SLAVES. 39-56
   - The Failure of the Confederation
 - Distress and Discontent of the People
 - Assembling of the Convention to frame a Constitution
 - Difficulties and Dangers
 - Antagonism between Freedom and Slavery
 - Basis of Representation
 - Debates thereon
 - Northern and Southern Parties developed
 - Slaveholding Interest successful
 - Committee of Detail
 - Duties on Exports
 - Regulation of Commerce
 - Slave-trade
 - South Carolina and Georgia demand its Continance
  The Bargain
 - Slave Representation
 - Slave-trade to be continued Twenty Years
 - Rendition of Fugitive Slaves
 - The Comprise
 - The Slave Power developed
 
CHAPTER V - PROPOSED TAX ON SLAVES - FIRST SLAVERY DEBATES IN CONGRESS - pETITIONS FOR EMANCIPATION - POWERS OF THE GOVERNMENT DEFINED. 57-68
   - Meeting of Congress
 - Proposition to tax Slaves imported
 - Debate on the Amendment
 - Defeat of the Proposition
 - Petitions for Emancipation
 - Franklin's Memorial
 - Excited Debate
 - Special Committee
 - Report of the Committee
 - Southern Members defend Slavery and the Slave-trade
 - Tone of the Debate
 - Powers of Congress defined and declared
 - Mr. Mifflin's Petition
 - Right of Petition violated
 
CHAPTER VI. - THE FUGITIVE SLAVE ACT OF 1798 - PROPOSED AMENDMENTS 69-78
   - Bill for the Rendition of Fugitive Slaves
 - Bill passed the Senate
 - passed the House
 - Petition of Free Colored Men to be protected against it
 - Exciting Debate
 - Memorial of Colored Men of Philadelphia
 - Exciting and Violet Debate
 - Disunion threatened by Mr. Rutledge
 - Action of the House
 - Further Legislation demanded
 - Mr. Pindall's Bill
 - Amendment by Mr. Rich
 - Mr. Storrs's Amendment
 - Debate on the Bill and Amendments
 - Mr. Fuller's Amendments
 - Bill passed the House
 - passed the Senate, with Amendments
 - House refused to take it up
 - Mr. Wright's Resolution
 - Bill reported by Judiciary Committee
 - Debated
 - Recommitted to a Select Committee
 - Reported but not acted on
 
CHAPTER VII. - THE SLAVE-TRADE - ITS PROHIBITION 79-97
   - Increase of the Slave-trade.
 - Memorial of the National Convention of Abolition Societies
 - Bill reported by Mr. Trumbull, and passed.
 - Memorial of Pennsylvania Quakers against the Re-enslavement of Emancipated Negroes in North Carolina
 = Exciting Debate
 = Mr. Sitgreaves's Report adopted
 - Mr. Hillhouse's Bill amendatory of the Slave-trade Act of 1794
 - Senate Bill referred to a Select Committee in the House
 - Reported with Amendments and passed
 - President Jefferson recommends the Prohibition of the Slave-trade
 - A Bill reported and passed in the Senate
 - A Bill reported in the House
 - A Debate thereon
 - Mr. Sloan's Amendment
 - Mr. Early's Threat
 - Mr. Sloan's Amendment defeated
 - Mr. Bidwell's Amendment
 - Death Penalty proposed by Mr. Smilie
 - Death Penalty defeated
 - Bill recommitted
 - Bill reported
 - Laid on the Table
 - Senate Bill taken up, amended, and passed
 - Mr. Randolph's Defiance
 - Further Legislation demanded
 
CHAPTER VIII - DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN SLAVE-TRADE - NEGOTIATIONS WITH FOREIGH POWERS 98-111
   - Extent of Domestic and Foreign Slave-trade
 - Cruel Character of the Traffic
 - Slave-breeding
 - Prosecution of the Foreign Trade
 - Christian Sentiment
 - Action of the Quakers
 - Motion of Mr. Burrell
 - Rufus King
 - Mr. Morrill
 - Mr. Eaton's Motion
 - Mercer's Resolution
 - Passage of the Bill
 - Mr. Gorham's Report
 - Co-operation with Foreign Powers recommended
 - Treaty of 1815
 - British Proposition
 - Mr. Rush's Treaty
 - Action of England
 - Dilatory Action of the Senate
 - Treaty amended
 - Mr. Clay's Reply
 - Insincerity of the American Government
 
CHAPTER IX. - FOREIGN RELATIONS OF THE GOVERNMENT INFLUENCE BY SLAVERY 112-122
   - American Government humiliated by Slavery
 - Treaty of 1783
 - Demand on England
 - Jay's Treaty
 - Free Negroes of San Domingo
 - Report of the Committee on Foreign Affairs
 - Debate
 - War of 1812
 - Randolph's Speech
 - Instruction to the Peace Commissioners
 - Treaty of Ghent
 - Demands on the Commander of the British Squadron
 - Position of the British Government
 - Persistent Demands of the American Government for Payment of Slaves
 - Decision referred to Russia
 - Proposed Invasion of Cuba by Mexico
 - Intervention of the Government of the United States
 - Debate in the Senate
 - Instructions of Mr. Clay to the Panama Commissioners
 
CHAPTER X - INDIAN POLICY AFFECTED BY SLAVERY - EXILES OF FLORIDA. 123-134
   - Disgraceful Attitude of the Nation
 - Escape of Slaves into Florida
 - Return of Fugitives refused
 - Commissioners to negotiate a Treaty with the Creeks
 - Action of Georgia
 - Protection demanded
 - Failure of Negotiations
 - Treaty negotiated at New York
 - Stipulation for the Return of Slaves
 - Spanish Authorities refuse to surrender Slaves
 - Misconduct of Georgia
 - Claims on England for Fugitive Slaves
 - Commissioners appointed to meet the Creeks in Washington
 - Annexation of Florida pressed by the Slave Power
 - Amelia Island seized by Georgia
 - Expedition sent by Georgia into Florida to capture Fugitives
 - Raid into Florida
 - Negro Fort
 - Order of General Jackson to invade Florida
 - Negro Fort Captured.
 - Exiles killed, captured, and reduced to Slavery
 - Disgrace of the Nation
 - General Jackson enters Florida
 - Defeats the Indians
 - Acquisition of Florida
 - Treaty of Indian Spring
 - Treaty of Camp Moultrie
 - Seizure of Slaves
 - Fugitives captured by the Army
 - Slave-catchers permitted to hunt Slaves
 
CHAPTER XI - THE MISSOURI STRUGGLE - THE COMPROMISES 135-152
   - The Louisiana Purchase
 - Missouri Territory
 - Bill authorizing the Territory to form a Constitution
 - Mr. Tallmadge's Amendment prohibiting Slavery
 - Exciting Debate
 - Amendment agreed to
 - Inhibition of Slavery stricken out by the Senate
 - Bill lost
 - Territory of Arkansas organized
 - Mr. Taylor's Amendment
 - Bill introduced by Mr. Scott to authorize Missouri to form a Constitution
 - Maine and Missouri united in the Senate
 - Mr Roberts's Amendment for the Inhibition of Slavery
 - Debate in the Senate
 - Mr Thomas's Amendment
 - Amendment agreed to
 - Bill passed the Senate
 - House disagree to Senate's Amendment
 - Mr. Taylor's Amendment
 - Bill passed
 - Conference Committee
 - Prohibition of Slavery defeated in the House
 - Prohibition of Slavery north of the Parallel of 36 30' agreed to
 - Triumph of the Slave Power complete
 
CHAPTER XII - ADMISSION OF MISSOURI - ATTEMPT TO INTRODUCE SLAVERY INTO ILLINOIS 153-164
   - Constitution of Missouri
 - Resolution of Admission in  the Senate
 - Mr. Eaton's Proviso
 - Mr. Wilson's Proviso
 - Debate
 - Passage of the Resolution of Admission
 - Report by Mr. Lowndes in the House
 - Remarks by Sergeant, Storrs, Lowndes, Cook
 - House Resolution rejected.  Senate Resolution referred to a Committee of Thirteen
 - Report of Committee rejected
 - Speech of Mr. Pinckney
 - Mr. Brown's Proposition
 - Appointment of Joint Special Committee
 - Mr. Clay's Compromise adopted
 - Conditions accepted by Missouri
 - Slaves in Illinois
 - Slave Codes
 - Governor Coles
 - Defeat of the Plot to make Illinois a Slave State
 
CHAPTER XIII. - EARLY ANTISLAVERY MOVEMENTS - BENJAMIN LUNDY - WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON 165-188
   - Aggressive and Dominating Spirit of Slavery
 - Elias Hicks
 - Antislavery in Kentucky and Tennessee
 - Benjamin Lundy
 - He organizes an Antislavery Society in Ohio
 - "Genius of Emancipation."
 - Removed to Tennessee
 - Established Abolition Societies in North Carolina
 - Meeting of the American Abolition Convention
 - Political Action recommended
 - Establishes his Paper in Baltimore
 - Visits the Eastern States
 - Joined by Mr. Garrison
 - Imprisonment of Mr. Garrison
 - Paper removed to Washington
 - Establishes the "National Inquirer."
 - Removal to the West
 - Death
 - Character
 - Mr. Garrison
 - Joins Mr. Lundy
 - Adopts the Doctrine of Immediate Emancipation
 - Denunciation of the Slave-trade
 - Imprisoned in Baltimore
 - Release through Intervention of Arthur Tappan
 - Denounces the Colonization Society
 - Establishes "The Liberator."
 - Public Sentiment
 - Rewards offered for his Arrest
 - His Fearlessness, Inflexibility, and Persistency
 
CHAPTER XIV. - THE VIRGINIA CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION - SOUTHAMPTON INSURRECTION.  SLAVERY DEBATE IN THE LEGISLATURE 189-207
   - Constitutional Convention
 - Struggle between Eastern and Western Virginia
 - Nat Turner
 - Message of Governor Floyd
 - Resolution of Mr. Summers
 - Debate on Slavery
 - Proposition of Thomas Jefferson Randolph
 - Mr. Goode's Motion to discharge the Committee
 - Report of the Committee
 - Mr. Preston's Amendment
 - Speeches of Mr. Moore, Mr. Bolling, Mr. Randolph, Mr. Rives, Mr. Brodnax, Mr. Daniel, Mr. Faulkner, Mr. Knox, Mr. Summers, Mr. McDowell
 - The "Richmond Inquirer
 - Reaction in the State.
 
CHAPTER XV. - THE FORMATION AND PURPOSES OF TEH AMERICAN COLONIZATION SOCIETY 208-222
   - Its Inconsistencies
 - Views of Dr. Hopkins
 - Mr. Jefferson's Proposition
 - Resolutions of the Virginia Legislature
 - Judge Tucker's Plans of Emancipation
 - Mercer's Resolutions
 - Meetings of the Society
 - Its Constitution and Officers
 - Its Purpose
 - Equivocal Position
 - Declarations of Mr. Clay
 - Avowals of its Advocates
 - Views of the "African Repository."
 - Black Laws
 - Compulsory Colonization
 - Action of Maryland Legislature
 - Action of the Free People of Color
 - Views of the National Conventions of Free Colored Men
 - Declaration of Mr. Webster
 - Mr. Garrison's Mission to England
 - Eliot Cresson
 - Protest of the British Abolitionists
 - Address of Mr. Garrison
 - Hold of the Colonizationists upon the Country
 - Their Proscriptive Course
 - Encouragement to Mobs
 
CHAPTER XVI - NEW ENGLAND AND NEW YORK CITY ANTISLAVERY SOCIETIES 223-236
   - Conference at the Office of Samuel E. Sewell
 - Adjourned Meeting
 - Adoption of the Preamble and Constitution of the New England Antislavery Society.
 - Officers of Society
 - Principles enumerated
 - Address to the People
 - First Annual Meeting
 - Resolutions
 - First Annual Report
 - Mr. Garrison's Resolution in Favor of a National Convention
 - "Emancipator."
 - Great Excitement
 - Public Meeting
 - Organization of the New York City Antislavery Society
 - Arthur Tappan
 - Lewis Tappan
 - William Goodell
 - Joshua Leavitt
 - Colonizationists
 - Denunciation of the Abolitionists
 - Rapid Increase of the Abolitionists
 - Publications of John G. Whittier, Lydia Maria Child, Amos A. Phelps.
 
CHAPTER XVII. - HOSTILITY TO COLORED SCHOOLS - MISS CRANDALL'S SCHOOL SUPPRESSED 237-247
   - Slavery Hostile to Education
 - Proposed Collegiate School at New Haven
 - Hostile Action of the Citizens of New Haven
 - Noyes Academy in New Hampshire
 - Colored Students admitted
 - Institution broken up.
 - Miss Crandall's School in Connecticut
 - Admission of Colored Pupils
 - Hostility of the People
 - Arbitrary Legislation
 - Imprisonment of Miss Crandall
 - Samuel J. May
 - Arthur Tappan
 - Trial
 - Failure of the Prosecution
 - Persecution of Miss Crandall
 - Incendiary Attempts
 - Abandonment of her School
 - Her Opposers Triumphant
 
CHAPTER XVIII. - NATIONAL ANTISLAVERY CONVENTION AT PHILADELPHIA - ORGANIZATION OF THE AMERICAN ANTISLAVERY SOCIETY 248-263
   - National Antislavery Convention called
 - Excited Condition of the Public Mind.
 - Conference held at the house of Even Lewis
 - Assembling of the Convention
 - Its Officers
 - Committee on the Declaration of Sentiments
 - Resolutions
 - Speeches of Lewis Tappan, Amos A. Phelps.
 - Female Antislavery Societies recommended
 - The Constitution
 - The Object of the Society the entire Abolition of Slavery
 - Conference on the Declaration of Sentiments
 - Words of Elizur Wright, Jr.
 - Declaration of Sentiments prepared by Mr. Garrison
 - Reported by Mr. Atlee
 - The Declaration adopted
 - Signatures to the Declaration
 - Its Doctrines
 - Officers of the Society, Elizur Wright, Jr., John T. Whittier, Amos A. Phelps, Theodore D. Weld, Ellis Gray Loring, Robert Purvis
 - Increase of Auxiliary Societies
 
CHAPTER XIX. - LANE SEMINARY - ANTISLAVERY ACTION 264-273
   - Antislavery Debate at Lane Seminary
 - Action of the Trustees
 - Antislavery Students dissolve their Connection with the Institution
 - Offer of the American Antislavery Society to give the Bible to Slaves
 - Conduct of Managers of the Bible Society
 - Abolitionists mobbed in New York
 - Address issued by the Abolitionists
 - Address of Massachusetts Antislavery Society
 - Doctrines of the Abolitionists
 - Abolitionists arraigned in the Annual Message of President Jackson
 - Reply of the American Antislavery Society
 - Activity of the Abolitionists
 - Rapid Increase in Numbers
 
CHAPTER XX. - MOBS - OUTRAGES IN CINCINNATI - WOMEN MOBBED IN BOSTON 274-286
   - Proscription
 - Theodore D. Weld
 - James G. Birney
 - Establishment of the "Philanthropist"
 - Mobs
 - Meeting of the Citizens of Cincinnati
 - Resolution of suppress the "Philanthropist."
 - Firmness of the Antislavery Committee
 - Riotous Mob
 - Destruction of the Press
 - The "Philanthropist" continued
 - Dr. Bailey
 - Mobs in Philadelphia
 - Continued Violence against the Abolitionists
 - Orange Scott
 - George Storrs
 - Meeting of Citizens of Boston in Faneuil Hall
 - Boston Female
 - Antislavery Society
 - Public Meeting of the Society
 - George Thompson
 - Mob Violence
 - Mayor Lyman
 - Seizure of Mr. Garrison
 - Imprisoned
 - Francis Jackson
 - Meeting at his Hosue
 - Remarks of Miss Martineau
 
CHAPTER XXI. - RIOTOUS DEMONSTRATIONS IN NEW YORK AND VERMONT 287-298
   - Convention at Utica
 - Mr. Beardsley
 - Joshua A. Spencer
 - Hall occupied by Citizens
 - Meeting in the Church
 - Society formed
 - Mob
 - Convention broken up
 - Members insulted
 - Gerrit Smith
 - Members invited to meet at Peterboro'
 - Officers of the Society chosen
 - Resolution and Speech by Mr. Smith
 - Antislavery Cause placed on high Principle
 - Samuel J. May
 - Mob in Vermont
 - Mr. Knapp
 - Colonel Miller.
 - Years of Mobs
 - Dedication of Pennsylvania Hall
 - Speeches by Alvan Stewart
 - Mr. Garrison
 - Mrs. Angelina Grimke Weld
 - Miss Abby Kelley
 - Mob
 - Burning of Pennsylvania Hall
 - Impotence of City Authorities
 
CHAPTER XXII. - SLAVERY AND THE SLAVE-TRADE IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 299-306
   - The Seat of Government
 - Sectional Claims
 - Capital fixed on Slave Soil
 - Slave Codes of Virginia and Maryland indeed
 - Inhumanity of the Slave Laws
 - Jails used by Slave-traders
 - Randolph's Resolution
 - Speech
 - Judge Morrell
 - Petition of  the Citizens against the Traffic
 - Mr. Miner's Resolutions and Speech
 - Resolutions adopted
 - Committee
 - Communication of the Grand Jury against the Slave-trade
 - Slave-traders licensed by the City of Washington
 - Men and Women whipped on their bare backs
 - Laws against Free Negroes
 - Responsibility of the Northern People
 - Arrest, Imprisonment, and Trial of Dr. Reuben Crandall
 
CHAPTER XXIII. - PETITIONS AGAINST SLAVERY AND THE SLAVE-TRADE IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA - DENIAL OF THE RIGHT OF PETITION 307-320
   - Presentation of Antislavery Petitions
 - Debate thereon
 - Petitions laid on the Table
 - Meeting of the XXIVth Congress
 - Presentation of Antislavery Petitions
 - Excited Debate
 - Mr. Jarvis's Resolution
 - Mr. Pinckney's Resolution
 - Report of the Committee
 - Petitions ordered to be ordered on the Table
 - Presentation of Antislavery Petitions in the Senate
 - Mr. Calhoun's Motion
 - Debate thereon
 - Mr. Calnoun's Motion to reject Petitions defeated
 - Mr. Buchanan's Motion to reject the Prayer of Petitioners adopted
 - Long Debate
 - Servility of Northern Members
 - The South Victorious
 
CHAPTER XXIV. - NORTHERN LEGISLATION DEMANDED 321-338
   - Spirit of the Abolitionists
 - Mr. Sullivan's Pamphlet
 - Dr. Leonard Woods
 - Mr. Hazard's Report
 - Charleston Post-office rifled
 - Public Meeting
 - Conduct of the New York Postmaster
 - Amos Kendall's Message
 - Resolutions of South Carolina Legislature
 - Resolutions of Southern States
 - Governor Ritner's Message
 - Governor Gayle's Demand for Mr. Williams
 - Message of Governor Marcy
 - Governor Dorr
 - Report of Mr. Stevens
 - Failure to legislate
 - Edward Everett
 - His Readiness to shoulder a Musket to put down Insurrection
 - Mr. Cambreleng rebukes him.
 - His Response to Southern Demands
 - His Message
 - Referred to a Select Committee
 - Resolution of Southern States
 - Action of Massachusetts Antislavery Society
 - Hearing before the Committee
 - Speeches of Mr. May, Mr. Loring, Mr. Garrison, Mr. Goodell
 - Mr. Lunt interrupts Mr. Goodell
 - Dr. Follen insulted by Mr. Lunt
 - Dr. Follen sustained by Mr. May
 - Memorial to the Legislature
 - Another Hearing
 - Speakers interrupted by Mr. Lunt
 - Excitement of the Audience
 - Mr. Lunt's Report
 - Resolutions laid on the Table.
 
CHAPTER XXV. - INCENDIARY PUBLICATION BILL - ADMISSION OF ARKANSAS - CONVERSION OF FREE SOIL INTO SLAVE SOIL - ATTEMPT TO CENSURE MR. ADAMS - RIGHT OF PETITION DENIED. 339-354
   - President Jackson's Message
 - Referred to a Special Committee
 - Mr. Calhoun's Report
 - Incendiary Publication Bill
 - Debate thereon
 - Mr. Van Buren's casting Vote
 - Defeat of the Bill
 - Application of Arkansas for Admission into the Union
 - Constitution guarantees Perpetual Slavery
 - debate on the Admission
 - Mr. Adam's Amendment rejected
 - Arkansas admitted
 - The Boundaries of Missouri extended
 - Free Soil made Slave Soil
 - Success of the Slaveholders
 - Second Session of the XXIVth Congress
 - Presentation of Antislavery Petitions
 - Presentation of a Petition by Mr. Adams purporting to come from Slaves
 - Violent Scene in the house
 - Mr. Patton's Motion to return the Petition to Mr. Adams
 - Motion of Mr. Thompson to censure Mr. Adams
 - Substitute moved by Mr. Lewis
 - Angry Debate
 - Mr. Adam's Defence
 - Triumph of Mr. Adams
 - Speech of Mr. Slade
 - Violent Scene
 - Caucus of Southern Members
 - Adoption of Mr. Patton's Resolution
 - Antislavery Papers not to be debated, printed, or read.
 - Subserviency of Congress
 
CHAPTER XXVI. - ACTIVITY OF THE ABOLITIONISTS - ACTION OF NORTHERN LEGISLATURES 355-373
   - The Abolitionists hopeful
 - Meeting of the Massachusetts Antislavery Society in the Capitol
 - Mr. Stanton's Resolutions
 - Public Sentiment
 - Formation of the Illinois Antislavery Society
 - Black Laws of Ohio
 - Condition of the Colored People in Ohio
 - Hearing before a Committee of the Massachusetts Legislature
 - Mr. Stanton's Speech.
 - Action of the Legislature
 - Decision of Judge Shaw
 - James C. Alvord
 - Resolutions against Texas
 - Legislatures of Connecticut and Vermont
 
CHAPTER XXVII. - THE ALTON TRAGEDY - MURDER OF ELIJAH P. LOVEJOY 374-389
   - Mr. Lovejoy discusses the Slavery Question.
 - Maintains the Right of the Press and Speech.
 - Murder of a Negro
 - Charge of Judge Lawless
 - Destruction of the Office of the "Observer."
 - The Press destroyed at Alton
 - The Slaveholders demand its Suppression
 - It is destroyed
 - Mr. Lovejoy mobbed in Missouri
 - Insulted at Home
 - Speech to the Citizens
 - Excitement in Alton
 - Mr. Linder leads a Mob
 - State Society formed at Upper Alton
 - Speech of Edward Beecher
 - Meeting at the Store to protect the Press
 - Assault upon the Warehouse
 - The Fire returned
 - Mr. Lovejoy shot; died.
 - Press thrown into the River
 - The Murder applauded or excused by the Supporters of Slavery
 - Resolutions of the Boston Abolitionists.
 - Faneuil Hall refused
 - Dr. Channing's Letter
 - Mr. Hallett's Resolutions
 - The Hall granted
 - Address of Dr. Channing
 - Resolutions of Mr. Hallett
 - Mr. Austin's Speech
 - Reply of Wendell Phillips
 - Excitement
 - Action of the National and Massachusetts Antislavery Society
 - Edmund Quincy
 - Non-Resistants.
 
CHAPTER XXVIII. - CALHOUN'S RESOLUTIONS - ATHERTON'S RESOLUTIONS - ASHBURTON TREATY 390-403
   - Calhoun's Resolutions
 - Smith's Amendment
 - Allen's Motion
 - Debate
 - Atherton's Resolutions
 - Southern Whigs
 - Mr. Slade
 - Speech of Mr. Clay
 - Speech of Mr. Morris
 - Resolutions of Vermont
 - Meeting of the XXVIth Congress
 - Mr. Wise's Resolutions
 - Mr. Thompson's Resolutions
 - Menace of Cooper
 - Mr. Botts
 - Motion of Mr. Adams
 - Amendment of William Cost Johnson
 - Feeling of the South
 - Letter of the World's Convention to Southern Governors
 - Quintuple Treaty
 - Protest of General Cass
 - Ashburton Treaty
 - Debate in the Senate
 - The Treaty sustained.
 
CHAPTER XXIX. - DISSENSION AMONG THE ABOLITIONISTS - DISRUPTION OF THE AMERICAN ANTISLAVERY SOCIETY 404-422
   - Increase of the Abolitionists
 - Dissensions
 - New York Abolitionists vote for Seward
 - Opposition of Mr. Goodell
 - New Party proposed by Mr. Smith
 - Action of the Massachusetts Antislavery Society
 - Young Men's Antislavery State Convention at Worcester
 - Resolution
 - Political Action
 - The Woman Question
 - Pastoral Letter
 - New England Convention
 - Protest of Mr. Torrey
 - Memorial to the Churches
 - Action of the Rhode Island Consociation
 - Churches and Ministers
 - The Abolitionists
 - Controversy between the Massachusetts and National Antislavery Societies
 - Opinion of Mr. Birney
 - Sixth Anniversary
 - The Woman Question
 - New England Antislavery Convention
 - Massachusetts Abolition Society
 - Address of the Society
 - Bitter Controversy
 - Financial Action
 - Proposition to dissolve the American Antislavery Society
 - Sale of the "Emancipator"
 - Seventh Anniversary of the American Antislavery Society
 - Rights of Woman conceded
 - Disruption
 - American and Foreign Antislavery Society organized
 - Both Societies appeal to the Public
 
CHAPTER XXX - ABOLITION PETITIONS - ARRAIGNMENT OF MR. ADAMS - RIGHT OF PETITION WON - MR. ADAMS'S POSITION 423-438
   - The Election of 1840
 - Death of President Harrison
 - President Tyler
 - Mr. Adams's Motion to repeal the 21st Rule adopted
 - The South warned against the Abolitionists
 - President Tyler's Letter
 - Thomas F. Marshall, Henry A. Wise, and Joshua R. Giddings
 - Vote on 21st Rule reconsidered
 - Discussion
 - Petition presented by Mr. Adams
 - Resolution of Centure
 - Caucus
 - Mr. Weld and Mr. Leavitt
 - Marshall's Resolutions
 - Speech
 - Mr. Adams's Defence
 - Remarks of Wise
 - Adams's Reply
 - Liberal Action of Underwood, Arnold, and Botts
 - Resolution laid on the Table
 - Debate in XXVIIIIth Congress
 - Remarks of Hale and Hamlin
 - Rule abrogated and Right of Petition secured.
 - Position of Mr. Adams
 - Criticisms of Garrison, Birney, and Goodell
 
CHAPTER XXXI. - COASTWISE SLAVE-TRADE - DEMANDS UPON THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT - CENSURE OF MR. GIDDINGS 439-455
   - Coastwise Slave-trade
 - American Vessels wrecked
 - Slaves liberated by British Authorities
 - Representations of the Case by the American Minister to England
 - The Action of the British Government denounced.
 - Resolutions of Mr. Calhoun
 - Debate on the Republicans
 - Remarks of Mr. Porter
 - Passage of the Resolutions
 - Exasperation of the Slave-holders
 - The "Creole" seized by the Slaves and carried into Nassau
 - Refusal to surrender the Slaves
 - Excitement in the South
 - Excited Debate in the Senate
 - Mr. Calhoun's Resolutions relating to the "Creole."
 - Mr. Webster's Despatch to Mr. Everett
 - Approved by Mr. Calhoun
 - Action of England
 - Resolution of Mr. Giddings
 - Exciting Scene
 - Resolution of Centure by Mr. Botts
- Resolution adopted by Mr. Weller
 - Resolution of Centure passed.
 - Mr. Giddings sustained by his Constituents
 
CHAPTER XXXII. - THE "AMISTAD" CAPTIVES. 456-469
   - Demands of Slavery
 - The "Amistad" captured by the Africans
 - Taken to New London
 - Africans claimed as Slaves
 - Demands of the Spanish Minister
 - Africans before the District Court
 - Conduct of District Attorney
 - Instructions of the Secretary of State
 - A Committee appointed to aid the Africans
 - The Attorney-General of the United States
 - Africans held for Trial
 - Decision of the Circuit Court
 - President
 - Declaration of the Secretary of State.
 - Appeal to the Supreme Court
 - Efforts of the Committee
 - Mr. Adams employed
 - His Argument
 - Arraignment of the President and his Cabinet
 - Discharge of the Prisoners
 - Labors of Lewis Tappan
 
CHAPTER XXXIII. - THE PRIGG CASE - THE USE OF ITS JAILS FORBIDDEN BY MASSACHUSETTS - AN AMENDMENT OF THE CONSTITUTION PROPOSED. 470-487
   - Various Interpretations of the Constitution
 - Margarette Morgan
 - Prigg Case
 - Supreme Court of Pennsylvania
 - Supreme Court of the United States
 - Decision
 - State Legislation not required
 - Taney
 - Daniel
 - Jurisdiction of the Government
 - Supreme Court of Massachusetts
 - State Laws repealed
 - Laws against the Use of Jails
 - Latimer's Arrest
 - Trial
 - City Officers
 - Excitement
 - Public Meetings
 - Meeting in Faneuil Hall
 - Edmund Quincy
 - Joshua Leavitt
 - Disturbance
 - Speech of Phillips
 - Remonstrances
 - Latimer Journal
 - Popular Demonstrations
 - Grey paid by Mr. Colver
 - Convention
 - Popular Demonstrations
 - Grey paid by Mr. Colver
 - Convention
 - Petition to the Legislature
 - Meeting in Faneuil Hall
 - Petition presented to Congress by John Quincy Adams
 - Proposed Amendment of the Constitution
 - Petition
 - Resolutions of Massachusetts
 - Singular Avowal of Mr. Wise
 - Mr. Holmes
 - Speech of Mr. Adams
 - Report of Committee
 - Massachusetts Senators
 - Action of the Legislature
 
CHAPTER XXXIV. - INTERMARRIAGE LAW OF MASSACHUSETTS - CASTE 488-498
   - The Law of Massachusetts
 - Petitions
 - Report of Mr. Lincoln
 - Debate
 - Mr. Davis's Report
 - Mr. Bradburn's Bill
 - General Howe's Bill
 - Sharp Debate
 - Repeal of the Law
 - Colored Persons excluded from the Cars
 - Scene on the Eastern Railroad
 - Action of the Legislature
 - Colored Schools
 - Controversy in Nantucket
 - Petitions to the Legislature
 - Mr. Barrett's Bill
 - Defeated
 - Mr. Wilson's Motion to reconsider
 - Earnest Debate
 - Reconsidered
 - Bill passed
 - Action of Boston School Committee
 
CHAPTER XXXV. - POSITION OF THE COLORED PEOPLE - FREDERICK DOUGLASS 499-511
   - Sentiments of the Colored People
 - Diverse Influences of Slavery and Freedom
 - Childhood of Frederick Douglass
 - Cruelties of Slavery illustrated
 - Attempts to escape
 - Sent to Baltimore
 - Became a Shipcaulker
 - Escaped to New York
 - Introduced to Mr. Ruggles
 - Arrived at New Bedford
 - Works in a Ship-yard
 - Addresses an Antislavery Convention in Nantucket
 - Impressions made upon Garrison and Rogers.
 - Becomes Agent of the Massachusetts Antislavery Society
 - Wonderful Effects of his Speeches
 - His Devotion to the Cause of his Race
 - Publishes his Autobiography
 - Visits England
 - Reasons for going
 - Establishes the "North Star."
 - Immense Labors of Twenty Years.
 
CHAPTER XXXVI. - THE FLORIDA WAR, - SLAVERY ITS CAUSE. 512-527
   - The Surrender of Slaves by the Seminoles demanded
 - The Additional Treaty
 - Agreement to remove to the West
 - Outrages perpetrated by Slave traders
 - Exasperation of the Indians
 - Stern Policy of President Jackson
 - Seizure of Osceola's Wife
 - Death of an Indian Agent
 - Destruction of Major Dade's Command
 - Conduct of the Citizens of Florida
 - Recall of General Scott
 - Action of General Jessup
 - Treaty of Peace; rejected by the Government
 - The Slave-hunters
 - admissions of General Jessup
 - Bounty offered to the Creeks
 - Dishonorable Conduct of Army Officers
 - Honorable action of the Cherokee Delegation
 - Noble Conduct of General Taylor
 - Treaty with the Creeks and Seminoles
 - Danger of the Exiles
 - Demands of the Creeks
 - The Exiles emigrate to Mexico
 - The Faith and Honor of the Nation tarnished
 
CHAPTER XXXVII. - DEMAND FOR THE RECOGNITION OF PROPERTY IN SLAVES 528-544
   - The Greed of Gain gratified by Slavery
 - Mr. Whittlesey's Report
 - Debates on the Question of Slave Property
 - Spanish Treaty
 - The Florida Claims
 - Mr. Cooper's Report
 - Mr. Giddings's and Mr. Adams's Speeches
 - Payment for Slaves by the British Government
 - Mr. Fillmore's Bill
 - Speech of Mr. Giddings
 - Violent Scenes in the House
 - Degradings Influences of Slavery
 - General Jessup's Contract with the Indians
 - Watson's Claim
 - General Gaine's Order
 - His Honorable Conduct
 - The Collins Claim
 - Action of General Taylor
 - Faithless Action of the Government
 - Renewal of Watson's Claim
 - Reports on the Claim
 - Watson's Claim allowed
 - Claim of Pacheco
 - Failure of the Bill
 
CHAPTER XXXVIII. - THE LIBERTY PARTY 545-555
   - Early Abolitionists pledged to Political Action
 - Questioning Candidates
 - Seward, Cushing, Fillmore, Brooks, Parmenter
 - A Political Party demanded
 - Myron Holley
 - New York State Society calls a National Convention at Albany.
 - Opposed by the Board of Managers of the Massachusetts Society.
 - Meeting of the Convention
 - Nomination of James G. Birney for President and Thomas Earl for Vice-President
 - Small Vote
 - Address of Committee
 - Salmon P. Chase
 - State Convention in Ohio
 - Peterboro' Convention
 - Address to the Slaves
 - National Convention
 - Resolutions
 - Candidates
 - Philadelphia Convention
 - Professor Cleaveland's Address
 - Eastern Convention
 - Dissensions
 - Unconstitutionality of Slavery
 - Divisions
 
CHAPTER XXXIX. - MOBS - ANTISLAVERY ACTIVITIES - WOMEN'S FAIRS 556-567
   - Riot at Cincinnati
 - Cowardice of the City Government
 - Manly Stand of Dr. Bailey
 - Riot in Philadelphia
 - Riots in New Bedford, Nantucket, and Portland
 - Riotous Demonstrations in the North
 - The Tone of the South
 - Divisions among Abolitionists
 - Nw Organization
 - Old Organization
 - Antislavery Fairs
 - "Liberty Bell"
 - Address to the Slaves
 - Address to President Tyler
 - One hundred Conventions
 - Thomas P. Beach
 - Visit of Abolitionists to England
 - Henry C. Wright
 - Case of John L. Brown
 - Decrease of Antislavery Societies
 - Spread of Antislavery Sentiments
 - The Impending Struggle
 
CHAPTER XL. - NO UNION WITH SLAVEHOLDERS 568-575
   - Meeting of the American Antislavery Society in 1842
 - Debate on the Issue of No Union with Slaveholders
 - Meeting of the Massachusetts Antislavery Society
 - Protest against the Constitution by Mr. Foster
 -
Mr. Garrison's Proposition
 - Meeting of the American Antislavery Society in 1844
 - The Doctrine of No Union with Slaveholders adopted
 - Protests
 - Address to the Abolitionists
 - Letter of Francis Jackson.
 - Gerrit Smith's Letter to John G. Whittier
 - Replies
 - Disunion Policy adopted.
 
CHAPTER XLI. - IMPRISONMENT OF COLORED SEAMEN 576-586
   - Imprisonment in South Carolina
 - Laws of Louisiana
 - Resolutions of Massachusetts
 - The Governor authorized to appoint Agents to defend Colored Seamen
 - Appointment of Mr. Hoar
 - Excitement in South Carolina
 - Action of Governor Hammond
 - Resolutions of South Carolina Legislature
 - Fines and Imprisonments imposed upon Persons that defend Negroes
 - Indignation at Charleston
 - Action of the Authorities
 - Mr. Hoar Forced to leave the State
 - Mr. Hubbard's Mission to New Orleans.
 - Compelled to leave
 - Petitions presented to Congress by Mr. Winthrop
 - Reports of Hoar and Hubbard
 - Message of the Governor
 - Action of the Legislature
 
CHAPTER XLII. - PLOT FOR THE ANNEXATION OF TEXAS 587-605
   - Dominating Influences of the Slave Power
 - Texas
 - Immigration from the South
 - Texas declared Independent
 - Annexation to the United States proposed
 - Rejected by Mr. Van Buren
 - Election and Death of General Harrison
 - Mr Tyler
 - Mr. Gilmer's Letter
 - General Jackson's Letter
 - Presidential Intrigue
 - Address of Members of Congress against the Texas Scheme
 - Duff Green's Letter
 - Visit of Mr. Andrews and Mr. Tappan to England
 - Motives for Annexation distinctly avowed.
 - Accusations against England
 - Position of the British Government.
 - Texas or Disunion
 - Conditions demanded by Texas
 - Death of Mr. Upshur
 - Mr. Calhoun made Secretary of State.
 - Treaty
 
CHAPTER XXLIII. - TEXAS PLOT CONSUMMATED 606-620
   - Presidential Election
 - The Issue distinctly presented
 - Position of the Whig and Democratic Parties
 - Embarrassing Position of Antislavery Men
 - The Alabama Letter
 - Secret Circular
 - Mr. Walker's Letter
 - Election of Mr. Polk
 - Meeting of Congress
 - Mr. Benton's Bill
 - Mr. Hale's Proposition
 - Mr. Ingersoll's Resolution
 - Mr. Hamlin's Motion
 - The Debates
 - Adoption of Mr. Brown's Amendment
 - Passage of the Resolutions
 - Reported against by the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs
 - Debates in the Senate
 - Mr. Walker's Amendment
 - Mr. Miller's Amendment
 - Passage of Joint Resolutions
 - Position of Southern Whigs
 - Weakness or Treachery of Northern Democrats
 - Action of Mr. Tayler
 - Rejoicing of the Friends of Annexation
 
CHAPTER XLIV. - VERMONT AND MASSACHUSETTS - JOHN P. HALE - CASSIUS M. CLAY 621-635
   - Action of Vermont and Massachusetts
 - Massachusetts Anti-Texas Convention
 - Proscription Policy of the New Administration
 - John P. Hale
 - Address to his Constituents
 - Denounced by the Democrats of New Hampshire
 - His Nomination withdrawn
 - Appeal to the People
 - "Independent Democrats"
 - The State Canvassed by Mr. Hale
 - Speeches of Hale and Pierce
 - Coalition between the Whigs and Independent Democrats
 - The Democracy defeated
 - Mr. Hale elected United States Senator
 - Brave Fight in the Senate
 - Cassius M. Clay
 - Opposes the Annexation of Texas
 - Visits the Northern States
 - Advocates the Election of Mr. Clay
 - Returns to Kentucky
 - Issues an Address to the People
 - Establishes the "True American."
 - Boldly denounces Slaveholding
 - Exasperation of Slaveholders
 - They demand the Suppression of the Paper
 - Refusal to comply with the Demand
 - The Paper forcibly suppressed
 - Mr. Clay appeals to the People
 - Reestablishes his Paper
 
CHAPTER XLV. - TEXAS ADMITTED AS A SLAVE STATE 636-651
   - Basis of Slavery
 - American Slavery
 - Slave Power
 - Issues of the Civil War.
 - African Slave-trade
 - Slaves brought into Virginia
 - Colonial and Commercial Policy of England
 - Slave-trade encouraged
 - Colonial Statues annulled
 - Spread of Slavery and Increase of Slave-trade
 - Slavery in New England
 - John Eliot
 - Samuel Sewell
 - Action of the Quakers
 - Testimonies against Slavery by Burling, Sandiford, Lay, Woolman, Benezet, Wesley, Whitefield
 - Emancipation advocated by Dr. Hopkins and Dr. Rush
 - Opinions of the Revolutionary Leaders
 - Slave-trade denounced by Congress
 - South Carolina and Georgia for the Slave-trade
 - Articles of Confederation
 - Development of the Slave Power.
 

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