ILLINOIS GENEALOGY EXPRESS


A Part of Genealogy Express
 

Welcome to
TAZEWELL COUNTY, ILLINOIS
History & Genealogy

 BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
PORTRAIT and BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD
of
TAZEWELL and MASON COUNTIES,
ILLINOIS
Prominent and Representative Citizens of the Counties,
Together with Biographies and Portraits of all the
Governors of the State and the Presidents of the United States
---
Chicago:
Biographical Publishing Co.
1894

  JOHN A. ANDREWS, the senior member of the firm of John A. Andrews & Co., millers, of Wahington, was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, Aug. 13, 1827, and is a son of the Rev. Wells Andrews.  His father was born and reared in Connecticut and was a son of of Asa Andrews, one of the heroes of the Revolution.  Rev. Mr. Andrews was graduated from Jefferson College, of Pennsylvania, entered the Presbyterian ministry and took charge of the church in Alexandria, Va.  He there married Nancy Harper, a native of the Old Dominion and a daughter of John Harper.  In 1826 he removed to Trumbull County, Ohio, where he remained for ten years as a preacher, after which he became a professor in the Ohio University at Athens.  The year 1843 witnessed his arrival in Washington, Ill., and after serving as pastor here for a short time he went to Tremont, then the county seat, where he spent eleven years.   On the expiration of that period he returned to Washington,
and was pastor of the Presbyterian Church until his decease, which occurred in February, 1867.  He was an active and prominent minister for a half-century, and his earnest and untiring labors were productive of much good.  He was one of the pioneer preachers of Tazewell County, and all who knew him respected him.  His wife passed away July 12, 1872.
     In the Andrews family were eight children, all of whom reached mature years, while live are yet living, viz.: John A.; James, who resides near Geneseo, Ill.; Lucy, wife of George Shaw, a resident of Henry County, Ill.; Margaret, widow of J. M. Harlan, a resident of Eureka, Ill.; and Chester, who is engaged in cattle raising in Nebraska.  Those deceased are, Mary, who became the wife of John M. Bush and died in 1856; Robert, whose death occurred in 1856; and Wells, who died Mar. 11, 1894, at which time he was senior member of the milling firm of W. & J. A. Andrews.
     Our subject was a youth of sixteen years when with his parents he came to Tazewell County.  He was educated in the Ohio University, of Athens, and on starting out in life for himself he turned his attention to farming.  Having purchased land in Washington Township, he continued to cultivate and improve his farm for about three years.  In 1851 he formed a partnership with his brother Wells and bought out the flouring mill of A. W. Danforth.  Since that time he has been engaged in the milling business, and his has been the only mill of importance in Washington during the long period of thirty-eight years.  He makes an excellent grade of flour, therefore receives a liberal patronage and enjoys an excellent trade.  He has also engaged in buying and selling grain, and from 1854 until 1866 carried on general merchandising.
     In 1855 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Andrews and Mary Telva Burton, a native of Kentucky and a daughter of Dr. Robert Burton, a physician of Kentucky, who brought his family to Tazewell County in 1837.  Here he engaged in practice for a time, and then embarked in the dry-goods business, which he followed until his death, in 1859.  Mrs. Andrews was reared in Tazewell County, and here died Nov. 21, 1878.  To our subject and his wife were born ten children, six of whom are yet living: Charles W., a farmer of Washington Township; James, who is now serving as County Treasurer of Dundy County, Neb., and makes his home in Benkelman; Telva, who is engaged in teaching in the public schools of Washington; Margaret Wells, at home; J. Andrew, who is studying medicine; and Anna, who completes the family.
     In early life Mr. Andrews affiliated with the Whig party, but since voting for John C. Fremont in 1856 has been a stalwart Republican.  He is a member of the English Lutheran Church, to which his wife also belonged.  One of the oldest settlers now living in this section of Tazewell County, he may well be numbered among the honored pioneers, and also among the valued citizens, for he has taken an active part in everything pertaining to the welfare of the community, and withholds his support from no enterprise calculated to prove of public benefit.
Source:  Portrait and Biographical Record of Tazewell and Mason Cos., Illinois - publ. 1894 - Page 263

 

CLICK HERE to RETURN to
TAZEWELL COUNTY, ILLINOIS
INDEX PAGE

CLICK HERE to RETURN to
STATE OF ILLINOIS
INDEX PAGE
CLICK HERE to GO to
GENEALOGY EXPRESS
INDEX PAGE


GENEALOGY EXPRESS
FREE GENEALOGY RESEARCH is MY MISSION

This Webpage has been created by Sharon Wick exclusively for Genealogy Express  2008
Submitters retain all copyrights