..


MARYLAND GENEALOGY EXPRESS

A Part of Genealogy Express

 

Welcome to
Harford County, Maryland
History & Genealogy


 

BIOGRAPHIES FROM:

HISTORY OF HARFORD COUNTY, MARYLAND
FROM 1608 (The YEAR of SMITH's EXPEDITION)
TO THE CLOSE OF THE WAR OF 1812
BY WALTER W. PRESTON, A. M.
BEL AIR, MARYLAND
1901

Press of Sun Book Office
Baltimore, Md.

< BACK TO BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX >

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
JACOB BOND.  The first of this family to take up land within the limits of what is now known as Harford county, was Peter Bond, of Anne Arundel, who came into the colony in the year 1660.  He acquired Pleasant Hills, on both sides of the Patapsco, about the mouth of Gwynn's Falls, now included in the city of Baltimore, and patented Harris' Trust, and in 1691 purchased the adjacent tract called Prosperity, lying on both sides of Bush river.
     He was twice married, and died in 1705, leaving sons Peter, Thomas, William and John, the two last named being minor children of his second wife, who, after a brief period of mourning (1707), married Phillip Washington.
     Peter Bond, as heir succeeded to all the east of his father except Prosperity and Harris' Trust, which were divided between the three younger sons.
     Thomas had already settled in Harford county, and in 1700 married Ann Robertson, of Anne Arundel.  He patented, in 1703, Knaves Misfortune, adjacent to the tracts above mentioned, where he built a substantial house in which he lived until his death.  This house was on the site of the residence of Mr. John R. Spencer, near Emmorton.  The old Bond house is said to have been built of brick imported from England, and part of it was standing up to the time of the erection of the present dwelling by Mr. Lee Magness, about twenty years ago.  Thomas Bond died in 1756.  This old house is said to have been used as a smallpox hospital about the time of the Revolution.  Thomas Bond lies buried near the hosue and the location of his grave is still known. 
     In 1714 he patented Bond's Forest, of three thousand one hundred acres, lying between Bynum's run and the Little Gunpowder Falls, and purchased Chapside and Poplar Ridge, with other tracts, amounting to about three thousand acres.  In 1705 he received five thousand acres, lying in Baltimore county, on the west side of the Susquehanna river, called Bond's Manor.  In 1739 he sold a portion of this land to Capt. Thomas Cresap, who thus became involved n the boundary dispute, from which William Penn emerged crowned with success.
     Thomas Bond, in 1749, conveyed to his sons Thomas and John, as trustees, part of Bond's Forest, to be laid out conveniently near the main road, including "a house now built intended for a meeting house for the people called Quakers to worship God in, and also a school-house already built."
     The records of Gunpowder Meeting show acceptance of this deed in 1753.  This was the beginning of the Little Falls Meeting at Fallston.
     He was a member of the celebrated grand jury which protested against the removal of the county seat from the Forks of Gunpowder to Joppa, denouncing it as "a palpable, notorious grievance to this county."
     Thomas died in 1755, having previously settled each of his sons in comfortable houses on "plantations," and divided his lands among his eight children.  His eldest son Thomas married Elizabeth Scott, and was the ancestor of large families of Jarrets, Amos, Bosleys, Howards and Munnikhuysens.
     John
married Alice Ann Webster, whose descendants are Fells, Lees, Wilsons and Bradfords.
     Joshua married Anne Partridge, and was the ancestor of many Lees, Morris, Morrisons and Howards.
     Jacob married Fanny Partridge, and from him are descended Prestons, Wilmers, Abbots, Gittings, Hollands and McCormicksSarah married William Fell, whose descendants are Fells, Fews, Dabs, Kennards, Dorseys and Johnsons.
     Ann
married Edward Fell, and afterwards Giles, and from her are descended Giles and Johnsons.
     John
, son of Thomas, who married Alice Ann Webster, joined his father-in-law in organizing the Bush River Company, which erected one of hte first iron furnaces in the colonies.
     Thomas, son of John, married Rebecca, daughter of Tobias Stansbury.  He was justice of the peace and judge of the Orphans' Court, and a zealous adherent of the Methodist church.
     His eldest son John was an itinerant preacher, and the friend and companion of Bishop Asbury.
     His son was Dr. Thomas E. Bond, Sr., a very celebrated preacher and editor of the Christian Advocate, the latter being the father of Dr. Thomas E. Bond, the younger, and Judge Hugh Lennox Bond, recently deceased.
     The most prominent of the Bonds from the standpoint of Harford history, was Jacob, who died in November, 1780.  He was a prominent member of the Committee of Harford County in the Revolution, having been elected by the people, and was captain of Company Eleven, of Harford militia, in the Revolution, the other officers being Thomas Johnson, first lieutenant; James McComas, second lieutenant, and Martin Preston, ensign.
     He was also one of Harford's representatives in the Annapolis convention of June 22, 1774, which protested against the tax on tea, his Harford Colleagues being Richard Dallam, John Love, Thomas Bond, John Paca and Benedict Edward Hall.
    
His children were:
     Jacob Bond, Jr.
     Sarah
, wife of Bernard Preston,
     Martha,
     Charlotte,
     Ralph,
     Dennis
, the father of Dr. Elijah Bond,
     Ann,
     Priscilla.
    
His will, dated Oct. 2, 1780, is recorded in the Orphans' Court at Bel Air.
     Bernard Preston, who married Sarah Bond, above named, was born in 1756.  He built the large stone house between Bel Air and Hickory now owned by Mr. John B. Wysong, his great-grandson.  Bernard's father was the first settler on that property, viz., James Preston,  the son of James Preston, who was the son of Thomas, named in the will of Richard Preston of Patuxent as "Thomas Preston of the Cliffs."
Source: History of Harford Co., Maryland - by Walter W. Preston, A. M. Bel Air, Maryland - 1901 - Page 202
WILLIAM BRADFORD, Sr., was of English ancestry, his family having come originally from Yorkshire, where Bradfords bearing the same family arms were found upon the Manor of that name, in the reign of Henry III.  He was the son of William Bradford and Elizabeth Lightbody, who came to Maryland early in the eighteenth century, and settled upon land at the head of Bush river.  His father was one of the early schoolmasters of the colony.  He was commissioned by the Bishop of London to teach on the plantations and became later on a soldier in the Colonial Army with the rank of captain.
     The subject of this sketch was born in 1739 at his father's home place, on Bynum's Run, just across which lived his near neighbor, Aquila Hall.  He obtained a good education under his father's tuition, and he also received an early training in the doctrine of the Christian religion, in which his family had for generations been more or less conspicuous.  His father had been registrar, clerk and vestryman in St. John's Parish, and he succeeded him as a member of the same vestry.  His paternal grandfather was John Bradford, a merchant of London, whose brother, Samuel Bradford, was Bishop of Rochester and Dean of Westminster, and his paternal grandmother was Mary Skinner daughter of Matthew Skinner, M. D., of London, and a granddaughter of Robert Skinner, Bishop of Bristol.  Several of his ancestors had also been closely connected in an official way with St. Ann's Parish, London.  His paternal great grandfather, William Bradford, was a parish officer therein during the great plague of 1665, and of whom is a recorded that "so conscientious was he in the performance of his duties that he remained in London, giving his personal attention to the sick and dying, through he removed his family to Islington.
     The latter's only children were, as stated above, John and Samuel, and a daughter, Hannah, who married Joseph Presbury, of London, and whose son, James Presbury, came to Maryland and settled near his cousin, William Bradford.  He was the ancestor of the Presbury family of Maryland.
     William Bradford, Sr., became a pronounced patriot, as did also his only brother, George Bradford.  Both he and his brother were elected members of the Harford Committee of 1775, the latter of whom would, no doubt, have been a signer, too, of Harford's "Declaration of Independence" had he been present at the time.
     The "senior" which William Bradford suffixed to his name when he signed the declaration, and which was something unusual for him to do, was to designate him from his nephew of the same name, who was also an ardent patriot and a lieutenant of Capt. Alexander Lawson Smith's Company of Fort Washington fame.  It was an earnest of the intense responsibility which he assumed, when he so solemnly pledged himself to the sacred cause of his country.  In September, 1775, he organized Company No. 13 of Harford Minute men, and was its captain.  He was married in 1764 to Sarah McComas, to whom were born eleven children, one of whom, Samuel Bradford, married Jane Bond, and lived for many years in Bel Air.  Samuel  was the father of Augustus W. Bradford, Governor of Maryland during the Civil War.
     William Bradford lived adjoining his brother upon a tract containing about three hundred acres, called "Littleton," where he died in 1794.
Source: History of Harford Co., Maryland - by Walter W. Preston, A. M. Bel Air, Maryland - 1901 - Page  214
 
 


 

CLICK HERE to RETURN to
HARFORD COUNTY, MARYLAND
INDEX PAGE
CLICK HERE to RETURN to
MARYLAND
INDEX PAGE
GENEALOGY EXPRESS
FREE GENEALOGY RESEARCH is My MISSION

This Webpage has been created by Sharon Wick exclusively for Genealogy Express  2008
Submitters retain all copyrights
.